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April 30 marks the one year anniversary of the moment the Cleveland Browns made Waukesha West's Joe Schobert the 99th overall selection in the 2016 NFL Draft. The outside linebacker's team will have the No. 1 overall pick in this year's draft – beginning Thursday – with much of the mock draft community anticipating that Cleveland will select Texas A&M defensive end Myles Garrett.

The Browns went 1-15 last year under first-year coach Hue Jackson. With the addition of new defensive coordinator Gregg Williams, the architecture of the Browns defense is likely to shift. For now, Schobert, who played in 16 games last year and started four of them, is penciled in as a starter on defense.

You can hear a full interview with Schobert on the Initial Reaction podcast. Some excerpts from the conversation:

On the prospect of a team adding new pieces on defense in the Draft, including linebackers ...

We have a young team already, so over the next couple years, we’re going to build a very good base. I’m excited to see how my class (and) this class comes in and works hard. Sure, you’re in position where (your job) could be threatened by someone who’s drafted, but the NFL is a production league. It doesn’t matter how you got there or who you are. If you produce more than the next guy, you’re going to be fine. You can only worry about yourself.

On his own draft day, when he became the first choice on Day 3 ...

I was expecting either end of the third or early fourth round; that's overall what I had been hearing. Friday night, I was looking at my phone, checking it all the time. I was a little disappointed, but I didn’t have my hopes up too high, so I couldn’t be that disappointed. I sat down on the couch right away to start watching the fourth round, and my phone rang the next second. I didn’t have a lot of time to think about it; it just happened.

On the business side of the NFL ... 

When they do the roster cuts in the fall, (down to) 75 (players) and then 53. One day, a team has 90 guys on it, and the next, it’s 75. Some of them might have been your friends or you might not have talked to them, but you just keep pushing forward like nothing’s happened. You don’t get to grieve because people got cut; there can be really no second thoughts about those guys. You keep plugging away and worry about your own stuff and stay in your own lane in that sense.

On playing the Packers in the preseason ...

After that, nothing really surprised me. Growing up in Wisconsin and watching the Packers your whole life, those guys are the idols in your eyes when you’re a kid in Wisconsin. Once you played against them, and (you see) they’re just a bunch of other dudes, just like us, that settled everything for me, expectation-wise, for the season.

On the changing face of Cleveland's defense ... 

Schematically, we have new coaches this year. We haven’t really talked about the team at all, but I think it’s going to be more of a 4-3 (defense). It’s still up in the air, just going to do my best, learn my scheme, learn my positions, and wherever the coach needs me to play, I’ll be willing to way. That’s part of the business side of it. If you can make yourself available at more positions and are willing to play more positions, you’re likely to stay around for a longer time.

On potential Badgers first rounders Ryan Ramczyk and TJ Watt ... 

I was going against Ramczyk every day (at Wisconsin) because he transferred, and he had to take a redshirt. He was on the scout team, and he was the best offensive lineman we played against all year, and he was in our practice every day. I expected TJ to have an extremely good year, too, because he’s always been a great athlete and just got unlucky those first couple years with those knee injuries. Once he switched to defense and stopped moving backwards to block and getting rolled up and had a healthy season, I knew he was going to be a beast.

On Brookfield native and Browns superstar offensive lineman Joe Thomas ... 

He’s an obvious future Hall of Famer and a it’s kind of a unique experience being able to watch him work his craft and prepare for games, and he’s extremely helpful with all the work offensive or defensive. If he’s watching one-on-ones and you’re going against him or something, he points out what he’s thinking pre-snap. If he’s thinking it pre-snap, another tackle in the league is probably thinking the same thing. Whether they execute or not as well as him is where he separates himself. He’s pointing out ways to take your mental and physical game to the next level.

On the relative anonymity of football ... 

When I was in Madison, I could go out. It's the perk of being a linebacker and a 6-2 white guy walking around campus. There’s not a lot of people, even the die hard fans, that recognize you. They just see you with your helmet on (when you play). I like being able to go around to the grocery store and do everything without having anybody stop you. People double check like if I’m doing something with my rent or trying to pay a bill and I have to give them my occupation, but pretty much that’s all that ever happens. It’s pretty low-key, under the radar, the way I like it. I usually just write "athlete" (in the occupation blank), and they ask questions from there if they’re curious.

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